Re: Tool borrowing etiquette?

Oh yeah,Slew…….I always call before I go. Here in FL or in Ja ckson we have the big three and between them they usually have the proper loaner.

One GOOD practice is to always look at it before leaving the store. It might have some damage and you don't want them keeping your deposit for something you didn't do.

Re: Tool borrowing etiquette?

EE704C8D-11DD-4E25-B941-48FCE3EC2DB5.jpeg
EE704C8D-11DD-4E25-B941-48FCE3EC2DB5.jpeg

I got a Shankly bearing separator (mini) 9 piece set for small engines. I think moped engines qualify. $ 21.95 @Amazon. Lot smaller than the ones at part stores, but I think it's perfect fit on mopeds.(edited)

Re: Tool borrowing etiquette?

Thanks, Les. That looks like the ticket.

Re: Tool borrowing etiquette?

♣Slew Foot♣ /

I have 2 huge flathead screwdrivers that I sharpened. I stuck crank in vise. Two taps they are under it. Pop right off no heat. If they struggle heat and a tow barfork for balljoints.

I think I used the clutch thing on a motobeacane...

Re: Tool borrowing etiquette?

I tried that on my first rebuild Slew. I was worried I'd fuck something up, or end up stabbing myself! :)

Re: Tool borrowing etiquette?

Dirty30 Dillon /

I love a good splitter/puller.

Just a tip Les, I like to throw something sacrificial between the puller's screw and the crank end to avoid mushrooming out the threads. Usually, I leave the nut on, flush with crank end, and chuck a piece of alu between the two. You never know when you might fuck up a perfectly good crank with just a bit too much twistin.

Re: Tool borrowing etiquette?

Like a washer? Dirty?

Re: Tool borrowing etiquette?

Dirty30 Dillon /

> Les B. Wrote:

> -------------------------------------------------------

> Like a washer? Dirty?

You can use anything that's softer than the crank material. I typical have small sections of scrap aluminum plate around, so I use those. But I've even used a penny before just to avoid balooning the end out and that works great. But whats really important is keeping the nut on there as well.

Re: Tool borrowing etiquette?

I think I’m gonna get this set. So that I can use it for more than mopeds.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01MRZLZ6J/

Re: Tool borrowing etiquette?

Pushrod Fifty /

I use a washer or aluminum slugs that I found somewhere that have a hole in center for the pointy to stick inside of. usually put the nut on just under the slug to protect the threads in case the whole thing goes flying.

Re: Tool borrowing etiquette?

Jefferson Bagley /

From Letterkenny, "When a friend asks for help, you help them." Having said that; there are limits. When someone asks for something I've always thought that it was my responsibility to explain tool borrowing etiquette (especially to younger people and children). " I need this back on Friday. It should come back clean and undamaged. " Some of my friends don't get to borrow tools anymore. The suggestion that they can come to my house and use it after 5 PM (maybe bring some beers) keeps everyone happy. I don't want a misunderstanding about a $25 sander to mess up a friendship and I don't want my late fathers' Starrett mic used to pound in a woodruff key.

Re: Tool borrowing etiquette?

Proper length of time to return a tool borrowed from me (IF I decide to loan it) is just before you step off my property. As a rule the answer will likely be NO if someone wants to borrow a tool though, specialty tools I would prefer to do the work and show who even needs the helps how to fabricate and use the toolage. YES - I AM AN ASSHOLE when it comes to such things as tools (or bikes - good luck with trying to ride any of my bikes) unless you are the lovely Rebelle.

If it is from my travelling set of tools (no specialty tools in that collection) then it is just like "whatever" because I consider them more or less expendable. I am not going to lose sleep over a missing socket (even the 10mm) or a forever borrowed vise-grip or screwdriver.

> Angry Hipster Wrote:

> -------------------------------------------------------

> What's the proper length of time to return a tool?

>

> I have a situation here where I loaned a moped tool to a person and it

> took them over a month to return it. Although to their credit they did

> return the tool unprompted - and without damage -, but the length of

> time seemed to bother me.

>

> The same person just asked to borrow the same tool again. . .

>

> Would it be reasonable to not be willing or am I just being crotchety?

>

> On the same token, I personally would hold myself to the same standards

> and would try to return anything I borrowed ASAP, and would be

> uncomfortable to borrow in the first place and would likely never ask a

> second time.

>

> IDK, I just could use some opinions on the matter. Thanks

Re: Tool borrowing etiquette?

♣Slew Foot♣ /

Yeah the screwdrivers I stabbed people if I usually like to keep...

Re: Tool borrowing etiquette?

Unless you have a good screwdriver. my to-go pack rocks a JIS#2 Impacta driver, it's a standard sized JIS #2 bt built in hammer impact. its so good and easy and convenient, that motherfucker's saved me from drilling out tons of shit, or struggling and stripping. magic. i love it. that said, i'd let people borrow it - except most of my friends have one already! (It was my default birthday gift for a year)

Re: Tool borrowing etiquette?

This one?

Looks a lot more convenient than that old clunky thing i use.

Re: Tool borrowing etiquette?

yeah, except i got the shorter length one cuz it fits in stuff easier. favorite tools, up there next to my motionpro tire levers, ratcheting 10mm wrench and my good circlip pliers.

Re: Tool borrowing etiquette?

Pushrod Fifty /

I use my impact screwdriver for all screws. If a regular screwdriver slips out of the notch it makes a mess out of the head. I don't like toolmarks on my screws or anything I work on. I want it to look like no one ever touched it. When I get a new project bike I fix the screw buggers by putting the screw in a small vise and tapping down the broken out metal and then use a bit to reform the notch. A little silver paint and they look untouched.

Re: Tool borrowing etiquette?

^ That's crazy anal! :D But, I bet it looks great.

Re: Tool borrowing etiquette?

> John Maxson Wrote:

> -------------------------------------------------------

> I use my impact screwdriver for all screws. If a regular screwdriver

> slips out of the notch it makes a mess out of the head. I don't like

> toolmarks on my screws or anything I work on. I want it to look like no

> one ever touched it. When I get a new project bike I fix the screw

> buggers by putting the screw in a small vise and tapping down the broken

> out metal and then use a bit to reform the notch. A little silver paint

> and they look untouched.

Ever use this stuff? Make em new!

https://www.caswellplating.com/electroplating-anodizing/zinc-plating-kits.html

Re: Tool borrowing etiquette?

> Born to be WillD Wrote:

> -------------------------------------------------------

> Unless you have a good screwdriver. my to-go pack rocks a JIS#2 Impacta

> driver, it's a standard sized JIS #2 bt built in hammer impact. its so

> good and easy and convenient, that motherfucker's saved me from drilling

> out tons of shit, or struggling and stripping. magic. i love it. that

> said, i'd let people borrow it - except most of my friends have one

> already! (It was my default birthday gift for a year)

Mine arrived from Japan today! Just in time to take apart my new Kawi G5’s

E2A09E91-0FB1-4AA2-8162-CEB594358AA2.jpeg

Thanks for the recommendation; it looks like a quality tool.

Re: Tool borrowing etiquette?

Angry Hipster /

I have a #3, it's awesome!

Re: Tool borrowing etiquette?

> Les B. Wrote:

> -------------------------------------------------------

> I got a Shankly bearing separator (mini) 9 piece set for small engines.

> I think moped engines qualify. $ 21.95 @Amazon. Lot smaller than the

> ones at part stores, but I think it's perfect fit on mopeds.

Thats a nice set there man.

Re: Tool borrowing etiquette?

Angry Hipster /

You guys are a bad influence, I just ordered a number 2 and a number 1. And I'm not loaning them out to anyone, muhahahahahaha!!!!!

Re: Tool borrowing etiquette?

Rick Bergsma /

I had an engine hoist , seemed like every time I lent it out I'd have to go retrieve it myself a couple months later . One time I lent it out and the guy lent it out to another person I didn't even know . I was pissed and never lent it out again after picking it up from the strangers driveway , and also showing the stranger how to install a distributor in a SBC cause he didn't have a clue .

On a brighter note , one guy that I lent it to was using it and the cylinder blew the seal and he bought a brand new cylinder for it before returning it .

Re: Tool borrowing etiquette?

> Rick Bergsma Wrote:

> -------------------------------------------------------

> I had an engine hoist , seemed like every time I lent it out I'd have

> to go retrieve it myself a couple months later . One time I lent it out

> and the guy lent it out to another person I didn't even know . I was

> pissed and never lent it out again after picking it up from the

> strangers driveway , and also showing the stranger how to install a

> distributor in a SBC cause he didn't have a clue .

>

> On a brighter note , one guy that I lent it to was using it and the

> cylinder blew the seal and he bought a brand new cylinder for it before

> returning it .

Nice of the guy to replace the cylinder. My neighbor, just last week, showed me his engine hoist and said it also needed a new cyl. I figured that was a rare thing, but he said hoist cyls. fail a lot of the time.

Re: Tool borrowing etiquette?

Pushrod Fifty /

Caldwell plating looks interesting.

Re: Tool borrowing etiquette?

haha nice! I used mine yesterday, this nighthawk250 we were talking about in another OT thread. Carb had a monster stuck stripped screw, i was not looking forward to drilling it out. Impacta and a half dozen good whacks? Freed up and removed! I love that tool

and speaking of engine hoists, I just returned he one i borrowed from a friend. it was juuuuust too big to fit in my car so it stuck out the windows, thought I was OK leaving em down (and bundling up, its cold) but weatherman told me a fib and it rained so I wound up driving around with garbage bags over the windows and freezing by bones to return that thing because yea, good etiquette i guess? I also didnt want it wasting my garage space anymore...

Re: Tool borrowing etiquette?

Angry Hipster /

I wonder if I am using mine wrong, I've had it strip out a couple of screws. You just hold it while applying counterclockwise pressure and tap it with a mallet right?

I will sometimes use JIS bits with a ratchet and that seems to work well too.

Re: Tool borrowing etiquette?

Rick Bergsma /

> Angry Hipster Wrote:

> -------------------------------------------------------

> I wonder if I am using mine wrong, I've had it strip out a couple of

> screws. You just hold it while applying counterclockwise pressure and

> tap it with a mallet right?

>

> I will sometimes use JIS bits with a ratchet and that seems to work well

> too.

Sounds like you're doing it right . Those screw heads are soft . Once they're stripped out , just drill the head off . There's usually enough sticking out of a case after taking a side cover off to grab the screw with visegrips and unscrew it.

Re: Tool borrowing etiquette?

> Angry Hipster Wrote:

> -------------------------------------------------------

> I wonder if I am using mine wrong, I've had it strip out a couple of

> screws. You just hold it while applying counterclockwise pressure and

> tap it with a mallet right?

>

> I will sometimes use JIS bits with a ratchet and that seems to work well

> too.

Having a selection of bits helps too. If #2 strips out try #3. If that doesn't work then I break out the dremel and small cut-off wheel. Cut a straight slot across head and use a straight bit.(edited)

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