Thanks Canadians!

For liberating my town exactly 75 years ago.

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And a special shout-out to Leo Major, who did most of the work.

Re: Thanks Canadians!

Rick Bergsma /

My parents were still teenagers in the Netherlands when Nederland was liberated by the Canadians . It's the reason they chose to immigrate to Canada after they were married. (edited)

Re: Thanks Canadians!

Jimmy Cincinnati /

And a special shout-out to Leo Major, who did most of the work.

Was that your actual town he liberated? I plan to listen to the video here in a bit while i prep. There were some crazy guys back then like Mad Jack.

Re: Thanks Canadians!

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Yep, he liberated my town.

He and that mad jack fellow do have some similarities.

Re: Thanks Canadians!

That's awesome! I don't remember the stats exactly but I think there was something about the Canadians kicking all sorts of ass at Normandy too, right?

They get that Maple syrup in them and get all antsy.

Re: Thanks Canadians!

Jimmy Cincinnati /

That's awesome! I don't remember the stats exactly but I think there was something about the Canadians kicking all sorts of ass at Normandy too, right?

https://www.historyextra.com/period/second-world-war/canadian-canada-d-day-ww2-allies-contribution-effort-juno-beach/

I found this article that seems like a good account of their involvement. Its hard to find stories other than American insight into the war... i know i have hollywood to thank for that but I really like hearing all angles of action. Like how did that German soldier coup when Hitler basically left them cut off & surrounded in Stalingrad?

We need more movies Stalingrad, Downfall, My Way, and letters from Iwo Jima.

Re: Thanks Canadians!

Bas, you conveniently FORGET to thank the U.S. for their `Supreme Allied Commander'...…..and `you know who' directed those Canadian forces. LOL!

Re: Thanks Canadians!

> Don Ohio Wrote:

> -------------------------------------------------------

> Bas, you conveniently FORGET to thank the U.S. for their `Supreme Allied

> Commander'...…..and `you know who' directed those Canadian forces. LOL!

WTF IS WRONG WITH YOU!

Re: Thanks Canadians!

Jimmy Cincinnati /

Bas, you conveniently FORGET to thank the U.S. for their `Supreme Allied Commander'...…..and `you know who' directed those Canadian forces. LOL!

He made some tough choices, but it was the soldiers carrying out those plans that had the most to loose.

“Your task will not be an easy one. Your enemy is well trained, well equipped and battle-hardened. He will fight savagely. … I have full confidence in your courage, devotion to duty and skill in battle. We will accept nothing less than full Victory!”

Re: Thanks Canadians!

> Jimmy Cincinnati Wrote:

> -------------------------------------------------------

> Bas, you conveniently FORGET to thank the U.S. for their `Supreme Allied

> Commander'...…..and `you know who' directed those Canadian forces. LOL!

>

> He made some tough choices, but it was the soldiers carrying out those

> plans that had the most to loose.

>

> “Your task will not be an easy one. Your enemy is well trained, well

> equipped and battle-hardened. He will fight savagely. … I have full

> confidence in your courage, devotion to duty and skill in battle. We

> will accept nothing less than full Victory!”

All that is irrelevant when Leo went above and beyond any and all orders given to him by any superiors. Obviously you did not read about or watch the documentary of Leo. The guy was a Rambo that needed NO guidance what so ever. (edited)

Re: Thanks Canadians!

> Don Ohio Wrote:

> -------------------------------------------------------

> Bas, you conveniently FORGET to thank the U.S. for their `Supreme Allied

> Commander'...…..and `you know who' directed those Canadian forces. LOL!

Bas didn't forget a thing. Bas can read and comprehend. One would think that at your age you would know how to read and comprehend before opening your pie hole! LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL! (edited)

Re: Thanks Canadians!

Yes =D~on was in the Netherlands when he was just a wee lad imitating his idle.

Re: Thanks Canadians!

Bas has continually dismissed the US role in freeing his country. I just straightened him out on who bossed the whole European operation. LOL!

Re: Thanks Canadians!

Yes =D~~on we know Hitler was the boss of the European operation

Re: Thanks Canadians!

> Don Ohio Wrote:

> -------------------------------------------------------

> Bas has continually dismissed the US role in freeing his country.

Can you read?? I'm talking about the liberation of my town. Not a single American set foot in my town during WW2. The entire liberation of Europe was a joint effort and not an American one, it would be just as normal to thank the Soviets as without them we'd all be speaking German right now.

Re: Thanks Canadians!

Rick Bergsma /

I just watched that video Bas . It's amazing that I've never heard of Leo Major.

You'd think we would've learned about him in school but I guess Canada doesn't celebrate their heroes .

Re: Thanks Canadians!

> Don Ohio Wrote:

> -------------------------------------------------------

> Bas has continually dismissed the US role in freeing his country. I just

> straightened him out on who bossed the whole European operation. LOL!

Ok boomer. Lol! Allied forces were going to bomb the town until Leo single handedly killed and captured all the Nazis. You are a fucktard for sure dUmDuM

Re: Thanks Canadians!

> Rick Bergsma Wrote:

> -------------------------------------------------------

> I just watched that video Bas . It's amazing that I've never heard of

> Leo Major.

>

> You'd think we would've learned about him in school but I guess Canada

> doesn't celebrate their heroes .

Leo Major didn't consider himself a war hero perse. He didn't like to talk about the war and shied away from attention.

The first time he went back here was in the 70's and he did learn to enjoy his trips To our town, if not just to honour his friend Willy Arsenault.

I believe a movie has recently been made about his life but i think its in French and i have yet to see it, but undoubtedly it will be turned into a overdramatic Hollywood blockbuster in the near future.

Re: Thanks Canadians!

ephraim zimbalist jr /

i love lee majors especially in fall guy when jumps off that bridge in a dress, very heroic

Re: Thanks Canadians!

Amazing to hear stories about exceptional soldiers. I’ve served with some tough dudes- but some of the old timers are fucking legends

Re: Thanks Canadians!

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Re: Thanks Canadians!

Lee major makes Rambo a Waterboy

Re: Thanks Canadians!

Don, getting your facts straight before you post would help you credibility so not everyone thinks you are ignorant to reality. (those would be the facts the rest of the world agree upon, not the hollywood propaganda machine generated ones)

Winston Churchill, Joseph Stalin and Franklin Roosevelt gathered in Tehran in 1943 to plan the final strategies for winning World War II.

> Don Ohio Wrote:

> -------------------------------------------------------

> Bas has continually dismissed the US role in freeing his country. I just

> straightened him out on who bossed the whole European operation. LOL!

Re: Thanks Canadians!

Canada sends the love back at your country, we are always so well treated when we visit. Also the shared relationship between two nations is commemorated each May for 10 days with the Tulip Festival at Commissioners Park, Ottawa, Ontario Canada, near the National Capital Buildings.

> Bas Autowas Wrote:

> -------------------------------------------------------

> For liberating my town exactly 75 years ago.

>

> And a special shout-out to Leo Major, who did most of the work.

>

>

Re: Thanks Canadians!

Eisenhower ordered relief missions before the surrender to keep the Dutch alive.

You should recognize the ALLIES role in saving your wartime family.

Thanks due to the Supreme Allied Commander who took the necessary action after Roosevelt died. Without this, Bas, you might never have been born.

So have your celebration , but remember the BIG picture of how Holland survived.

The Allies’ Mission of Mercy, 70 Years Ago

Seventy years ago, Allied aircraft embarked on a risky mission to drop food, not bombs, onto Nazi-occupied portions of the Netherlands.

Christopher Klein

Excerpt from History.com:

`In the dying days of World War II, the days of dying still continued. Although the Third Reich had lost its grip across much of Europe by the spring of 1945, more than 120,000 German troops continued to occupy the western part of the Netherlands—including cities such as Amsterdam, Rotterdam and The Hague—where approximately 3.5 million hungry Dutch citizens withered under Nazi rule.

On top of more than four years of occupation, the Dutch suffered a brutal winter in 1944-45. In retaliation for a Dutch railway strike in the fall of 1944, German troops had blocked the delivery of food and destroyed dikes holding back the North Sea, which caused devastating flooding to coastal farmlands. Driven to desperation during the “hunger winter,” the starving Dutch ate fried tulip bulbs and even cut their hair, boiled it and drank the broth for protein. By April 1945, the British military estimated that more than 500,000 residents of occupied Holland were on the brink of death.

The Dutch royal family, living in exile in London, appealed to the Allied powers for help. “If a major catastrophe, the like of which has not been seen in Western Europe since the Middle Ages, is to be avoided in Holland, something drastic has to be done now,” Dutch Queen Wilhelmina desperately wrote to British and American leaders. U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt, proud of his family’s Dutch roots, pledged American aid. “You can be very certain that I shall not forget the country of my origin,” he wrote to the queen on March 21, 1945.

A crew loading food into the bomb bay of an RAF Lancaster during Operation Manna.

Not until after Roosevelt’s sudden death three weeks later were his wishes for a mission of mercy to the Netherlands relayed to Allied Supreme Commander Dwight D. Eisenhower by U.S. Army Chief of Staff George C. Marshall. On April 29, 1945, a pair of Royal Air Force Lancaster heavy bombers manned by British, Australian and Canadian crewmembers departed England on the first flights of Operation Manna, codenamed for the bread that rained down from heaven onto the Israelites in the Book of Exodus. Two days later on May 1, just hours after German Chancellor Adolf Hitler committed suicide, the first American B-17 Flying Fortress bombers took to the skies in their counterpart relief mission, codenamed Operation Chowhound.

Although the planes were embarking on humanitarian operations, Stephen Dando-Collins, author of the new book “Operation Chowhound,” calls the U.S. bomber mission “the most risky” of World War II. “The Chowhound and Manna crews were flying into the unknown,” he says. “At least on normal missions most risks were known. To begin with, aircrews were told that the Germans had agreed not to fire on aircraft flying these missions, but the agreement not to fire was not signed by the Germans until four days into the Manna/Chowhound missions. In fact, Eisenhower gave instructions to launch the first flights before there was even a verbal agreement from the Germans in Holland.

“Next, the bombers were to fly at 300 to 400 feet, and as slow as possible, to make their drops, hoping that the enemy would keep their word not to fire. They were sitting ducks at such low levels. If the Germans had opened fire with all their guns, chances of survival for aircrew were minimal; there was neither the time nor the height to successfully bail out.”

Arthur Seyss-Inquart, the senior Nazi Party official governing the Netherlands, gave orders to German troops not to fire on Allied airplanes flying in specified corridors, and, like so many other Nazi orders during World War II, they were followed down the chain of command. “They could see the writing on the wall,” Dando-Collins says, “and knew it was only a matter of time before they were prisoners of the Allies, so they tried to feather their future beds a little by cooperating.” Eisenhower was taking an enormous chance in trusting the enemy, Dando-Collins says, because if they broke their word, “B-17s and Lancasters would have been knocked out of the sky wholesale, and we would be talking today about the most disastrous Allied air mission of World War II, a disaster which would have seen Eisenhower stripped of his command.”

For 10 days, Allied bombers flew across the North Sea and buzzed over Holland’s flooded lowlands and tulip fields ablaze in springtime colors. Weaving between church steeples and windmills, pilots used to flying at 20,000 feet and above flew so low they could make eye contact with the starving citizens and the wary Nazi soldiers following their flight paths with their anti-aircraft guns. As their engines roared overhead, men, women and children waved handkerchiefs and Dutch flags as the planes deployed their payloads—bags and boxes filled with chocolate bars, margarine, coffee, milk powder, salt, cheese and flour—on airfields and racetracks across the Netherlands. As food—and salvation—fell from the skies, crews saw for themselves the gratitude of the Dutch people in messages such as the field of manicured tulips arranged by one grateful farmer to spell out, “Thank You Yanks.”

At the height of the relief effort, more than 900 bombers a day took to the skies. Although a handful of American aircraft were hit by sporadic German ground fire, none were shot down. “Personally, I’m astonished that so few did open fire,” Dando-Collins says. One B-17, however, was lost during Operation Chowhound after a mechanical failure forced it to crash into the North Sea, resulting in the deaths of 11 servicemen.

Operations Chowhound and Manna came to an end with the arrival of the Allied victory in Europe on May 8, 1945. Over 10 days, British Lancaster and Mosquito bombers flew more than 3,000 sorties. American bombers flew more than 2,200 missions. In total, Allied aircraft transported more than 11,000 tons of food, saved thousands of lives and set a valuable precedent for the Berlin Airlift in 1948 and 1949 and future humanitarian missions to come.

NO, they didn't set foot in Amsterdam, they set FOOD in Amsterdam. (edited)

Re: Thanks Canadians!

Your the most pathetic thing that's consuming oxygen please cease and desist.

Thank you in advance

Re: Thanks Canadians!

Dear Canada and The Netherlands,

On behalf of the United States of America, I would like to apologize for Don Ohio. He is a disgrace to our country, as is our president, Donald Trump.

Re: Thanks Canadians!

> A Zed Wrote:

> -------------------------------------------------------

> Dear Canada and The Netherlands,

>

> On behalf of the United States of America, I would like to apologize for

> Don Ohio. He is a disgrace to our country, as is our president, Donald

> Trump.

I concur 100% with the above.

Sorry Canada that are educational system and mental health is lagging so badly in the United States that we have people like this actually running around with the right to vote sorry about that.

If we only had 100% socialized medicine in this country things would be much better.

Re: Thanks Canadians!

> A Zed Wrote:

> -------------------------------------------------------

> Dear Canada and The Netherlands,

>

> On behalf of the United States of America, I would like to apologize for

> Don Ohio. He is a disgrace to our country, as is our president, Donald

> Trump.

Re: Thanks Canadians!

Nice American incorrect propaganda recollection of some of the facts, Dong.

The reason for the annual Tulip Festival is commemorating the relationship between Canada and their country.

Foe example. the reference to England is incorrect. Britain was under heavy attack during WW2 and was NOT a safe haven for the family. The Dutch family had been living in Canada since June 1940 after the occupation of the Netherlands by Nazi Germany. The maternity ward of Ottawa Civic Hospital in which Princess Margriet was born was temporarily declared to be extraterritorial by the Canadian government. Making the maternity ward outside of the Canadian domain caused it to be unaffiliated with any jurisdiction and technically international territory. This was done to ensure that the newborn would derive her citizenship from her mother only, thus making her solely Dutch, which could have been very important if the child had been male, and as such, the heir of Princess Juliana.

It was not until August 1945, when the Netherlands had been liberated, that Princess Margriet first set foot on Dutch soil. Princess Juliana and Prince Bernhard returned to Soestdijk Palace in Baarn, where the family had lived before the war.

> Don Ohio Wrote:

> -------------------------------------------------------

> The Dutch royal family, living in exile in London, appealed to the

> Allied powers for help. “If a major catastrophe, the like of which has

> not been seen in Western Europe since the Middle Ages, is to be avoided

> in Holland, something drastic has to be done now,” Dutch Queen

> Wilhelmina desperately wrote to British and American leaders. U.S.

> President Franklin D. Roosevelt, proud of his family’s Dutch roots,

> pledged American aid. “You can be very certain that I shall not forget

> the country of my origin,” he wrote to the queen on March 21, 1945.

>

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