Power issues on any sort of incline

I have a 2005 kinetic tfr, and i am not anticpating to get a ton of power out of it, but on any sort of incline it loses its power it seems all together. However when sitting on a stand it feels so powerful and runs strong. Any ideas? I will post video. Thinking maybe a carb cleaning will help?

Re: Power issues on any sort of incline

Your tire shouldn't be spinning that fast at idle. You have an air leak somewhere that's causing it to run lean and hot. Best case scenario you lose power, worst case you seize your engine.

Re: Power issues on any sort of incline

How do i go about finding the air leak?/ If it is running lean? can i add more oil to the mix?

Re: Power issues on any sort of incline

> aidan f Wrote:

> -------------------------------------------------------

> How do i go about finding the air leak?/ If it is running lean? can i

> add more oil to the mix?

No. You need to spray starter fluid around areas that air could be sucked in while the bike is running. Where the cylinder meets the head, cylinder meets the cases, intake meets the cylinder, carb meets the intake

Re: Power issues on any sort of incline

THank you for your helps guys! Just trying to make it run right :)

Re: Power issues on any sort of incline

Pushrod Fifty /

Look at your sparkplug. If will tell you how its running.

Re: Power issues on any sort of incline

You should be able to use carburetor cleaner spray to check the condition of your crankshaft seals, assuming that this is a two-stroke engine. The seals do not wear very quickly and are usually not a problem, but when they fail they'll do odd things to the engine's performance.

My 1984 Trac Clipper wouldn't get halfway up the test hill. My guess is that the difficulty is the crankshaft seals, especially because the hill-stalling problem was accompanied by a slipping clutch. I believe that the clutch plates were slipping from the fuel mixture leaking past the crankshaft seal. As soon as I get the correct seal I'll clean the clutch and report my findings.

Re: Power issues on any sort of incline

> Mark Kinsler Wrote:

> -------------------------------------------------------

> You should be able to use carburetor cleaner spray to check the

> condition of your crankshaft seals,

That is not a good idea as carb cleaner tends to eat rubber type things .

Use brake cleaner . It's much more effective and won't eat the seal .

Re: Power issues on any sort of incline

thanks for your comment! Let me know what happens with yours. I am just not wanting to hurt it at all so hearing out a few peoples suggestions is awesome.

Re: Power issues on any sort of incline

Okay so i should use brake cleaner! Spraying on all connection points of engine? Looking for bubbling/air escaping?

Re: Power issues on any sort of incline

> aidan f Wrote:

> -------------------------------------------------------

> Okay so i should use brake cleaner! Spraying on all connection points of

> engine? Looking for bubbling/air escaping?

With the motor idling , any leak will cause the motor RPM to noticeably change when sprayed with brake cleaner . Use the little directional tube so you can pin point an area at a time , rather than just bombing the whole motor .

RPM change depends on whether the brake cleaner is flammable ( up or faster ) or not ( down or slower ) .

Re: Power issues on any sort of incline

Thank you. I didn't know that. Brake cleaner it is, then.

I'll do some experimenting with carburetor cleaner spray, however, for I've used it for years in many applications. My guess is that the vulnerability of the rubber would depend upon its specific composition, of which there are, like, hundreds.

70% (or stronger, I use 91%) rubbing alcohol would also do well. I've used it to clean oil from rubber parts.

M Kinsler

Re: Power issues on any sort of incline

> Mark Kinsler Wrote:

> -------------------------------------------------------

> >

> 70% (or stronger, I use 91%) rubbing alcohol would also do well. I've

> used it to clean oil from rubber parts.

>

> M Kinsler

Rubbing alcohol works . I've used it myself more than a few times . ;)

I think you'll find that brake cleaner cleans better , quicker and leaves no residue than carb cleaner .

I quit buying carb cleaner back in the late 70s or thereabouts . ;)

Re: Power issues on any sort of incline

I'm delighted to do so, for I've already been assisted myself several times. The people here are excellent, as are the moderators. Suggestions have been both helpful and kind, and that's not always the case on Internet forums.

Re: Power issues on any sort of incline

This operation must be done with the engine running, for we're looking for a variation in the engine's speed when the brake cleaner is sprayed upon components that should be sealed but perhaps are not, and which also contain a partial vacuum during part of the 2-stroke cycle. These would include the engine seals and the juncture between carburetor and crankcase.

Get your motor running and spray the cleaner as close to the crankshaft bearings as you can. On my bike the crankshaft bearings and the seals just outboard of them are located beneath the clutch and beneath the magneto.

Now, I have not done this myself on this bike, so proceed with caution and skepticism, but: a spray of brake cleaner, which should be the stuff with the flammability warning on it, should not affect the engine's speed when sprayed near the crank bearing seals. If it does, then some of the brake cleaner is being pulled into the engine past the seals, which indicates that the seals are leaking.

Note that if you have non-electronic ignition the magneto will contain a set of merrily-sparking pair of ignition points, which could conceivably ignite the brake cleaner, though that's unlikely. Just be careful. Or, if the other seal proves questionable, simply replace both seals without trying to test the seal beneath the magneto.

Re: Power issues on any sort of incline

Carburetor cleaner seems to be a regional sort of substance, like fine wine. I think the stuff sold in California lacks the aggressive solvents required to dissolve the worst of the crud out of the pivots of a grandfather clock. At least that's what I've used it for, though only in emergency situations, for it's a poor way to clean a clock.

As suggested, however, a non-flammable brake cleaner will be equally effective in detecting a vacuum leak, for it'll simply slow or stop the engine.

Full disclosure: it took me years to find a dumb vacuum leak that plagued the engine of my beloved (and under external restoration) 1964 Econoline van. Some things are not apparent to even the most mechanically-woke mind, especially if it's on your own truck. (It was a bad PCV valve hose. Sheesh.)

Re: Power issues on any sort of incline

Okay thanks for all the positive feedback! i Am going to update how it goes. Going to look up parts diagram as well :)

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