Book

I am totally new to working on a moped. I would like to take an older one, take it all apart, and completely rebuild the engine. I know next to nothing about the pieces I will be working on.

Can you recommend a book that would get me started?

Re: Book

Re: Book

Read it.... most of the video links are no longer working.

I need a more step by step, this is called a “x”, here is how it works, this is how you take it apart correctly, check for wear, clean it correctly, re grease it, assemble it correctly.

How to test things...

Re: Book

A book could get you there.

What would be even better is a mentor.

Ain’t no friends to play mopeds with in Michigan?

Re: Book

Search for rebuild threads or look at rebuilds In the wiki. It's completely different from different manufacturers.

Alotta service manuals available if you search for specific engines

Re: Book

Dirty30 Dillon /

What moped do you have? It's easy enough to find the service manuals for most of the common US models.

If you're looking for a Haynes-style manual, those are harder to find

Re: Book

I don't think I ever even put my hands on a book until well after I'd had many years experience fixing stuff .

That was before I was afraid I might screw something up .

Now , it doesn't matter if anything gets screwed up , because I can always fix it . ;)

Re: Book

It depends on your present level of experience with repair work. Mopeds seem simple but are highly engineered to maximize economy in manufacturing and operation. This means that there are subtleties that can be very puzzling even if you've worked on other machinery, including motorcycles.

But on the assumption that you're starting with the usual level of experience, which is typically none, go to the library and borrow a book on small engine repair. This will take you through the principles of operation of two- and four-stroke gasoline engines including carburetors, ignition systems, and lubrication. There will be specifics about engines you're unlikely to work on, but read them anyway, for the principles used in non-moped items like oil pumps, battery ignition systems, and the valve trains of four-stroke engines are part of the greater mechanical world and you'll run into variants of them later.

Mark Kinsler

Re: Book

> Mark Kinsler Wrote:

> -------------------------------------------------------

> It depends on your present level of experience with repair work. Mopeds

> seem simple but are highly engineered to maximize economy in

> manufacturing and operation. This means that there are subtleties that

> can be very puzzling even if you've worked on other machinery, including

> motorcycles.

>

> But on the assumption that you're starting with the usual level of

> experience, which is typically none, go to the library and borrow a book

> on small engine repair. This will take you through the principles of

> operation of two- and four-stroke gasoline engines including

> carburetors, ignition systems, and lubrication. There will be specifics

> about engines you're unlikely to work on, but read them anyway, for the

> principles used in non-moped items like oil pumps, battery ignition

> systems, and the valve trains of four-stroke engines are part of the

> greater mechanical world and you'll run into variants of them later.

>

> Mark Kinsler

I will add that attention to detail really helps .

Always remember : it's the little things that make the big things run . ;)

Re: Book

just use the search function

Re: Book

Most manuals are available online to download a PDF.

Another tip is to take pics with your phone of everything you're about to take apart, and as you go along. Especially engines and wiring. Really helps if you take something apart, then don't get back to it for a while and you forgot how everything goes back together.

Re: Book

I was surprised as hell but my library had a ton of moto service manuals including puch and honda mopeds and MB5's. pretty cool! Libraries are FUCKING AWESOME!!!

Re: Book

It's good that you've found the manuals, but if you have little mechanical experience I'd still recommend a general text on small engine repair. Many manuals assume that you're already fairly skilled in the art and mystery of repair work, and I'm sorry to say that some of them are difficult to understand either because they're translated from the original German or because engineers can't write particularly well. That's why a bit of grounding in basic principles is helpful.

Also, be aware that the English versions of many motor vehicle manuals were translated to or written in British English rather than American English. This makes them suitable for the UK and (especially) India. Guyana, too. So you may find yourself using Google to figure out what a gudgeon is (I think it's a piston pin) or the various varieties of spanners. (They're wrenches.)

Re: Book

Dirty30 Dillon /

> Mark Kinsler Wrote:

> -------------------------------------------------------

> It's good that you've found the manuals, but if you have little

> mechanical experience I'd still recommend a general text on small engine

> repair.

What you are telling him to find, is exactly what he's asking for.

Re: Book

> Born to be WillD Wrote:

> -------------------------------------------------------

> I was surprised as hell but my library had a ton of moto service manuals

> including puch and honda mopeds and MB5's. pretty cool! Libraries are

> FUCKING AWESOME!!!

Uh...yeah? Not sure if they still have them, but there were many many books on mopeds back in the day, as well as Haynes style manuals, complete with dirty fingerprints in them! :)

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