Re: Zip Tie Trick?

> P D Wrote:

> Definitely be careful where you use Simple Green

The only thing I ever use it on is my tires. Use it to put them on, and I drench them in it the day before I race. Makes em sticky.

Re: Zip Tie Trick?

I may try the zip tie method just to see how difficult it is. I once had to repair a motorcycle tire on I-90 in Connecticut, and it really refused to go back onto the rim. I finally was able to brace the tire against the wheel of the rescue car and shove the bead back over the rim by pushing it with a two-by-four. The correct tools would have helped, but it was in 1971 when I was short on money and tools.

Mark Kinsler

Re: Zip Tie Trick?

Dirty30 Dillon /

i-90 doesn't run through CT.

Re: Zip Tie Trick?

Honestly, the 2.25 practically put itself on. The 2.75 took a bit of a strong arm, but my mistake on that was thinking I needed more zip ties. I used 16 and struggled to the last bit and couldn't get any further. I took it off and removed 8 ties and it was on in a minute.

Re: Zip Tie Trick?

I've used Simple Green for cleaning clock movements, but hadn't had it dissolve anything. My current favorite degreaser is Zep Fast 505, which will remove paint but doesn't dissolve anything but grease and dirt. (I'm told that I would have liked Simple Green better had I diluted it according to the instructions, which I did not. Fast 505 works well just straight.)

That coil could probably have been rewound. Motorbike voltages are low and their coils are wound with wire that's fairly thick and not all that difficult to handle.

Mark Kinsler

Re: Zip Tie Trick?

> Mark Kinsler Wrote:

> -------------------------------------------------------

> That coil could probably have been rewound. Motorbike voltages are low

> and their coils are wound with wire that's fairly thick and not all that

> difficult to handle.

>

> Mark Kinsler

This coil is wound with something like 30 gauge or even smaller . Very fine wire .

It is a dual output coil and seems to be double wound .

I stripped the leftover protective rubber type coating off and was lucky enough to have found the second end . The first end still had a connector attached , not so with the second .

I have tried running the coil using both outputs and it seems to work , but , I'm not sure if it does full duty while both plugs are under compression ( possibly weak ) .

I plan to experiment with adding neodymium magnets to the current flywheel magnets , in an attempt to increase output strength .

Re: Zip Tie Trick?

Garages used to have a little spark-plug tester that you'd pump full of air to see if a questionable spark plug would fire under compression. But in your case it might be just as easy to put the plugs and the coil back into the engine and try it out. I mention this because I tried repeatedly to improve the ignition system on my Trac Clipper (with a standard Bosch magneto) without realizing that it was working perfectly and would have benefited had I kept my mitts off of it. (The problem was a bad carburetor float.)

It's really easy to overthink the issue surrounding these little engines. I do it constantly, searching for microscopic evidence of molecular turbulence when I have, in fact, forgotten to turn the fuel valve back on.

Good luck, and be sure to report your results.

Mark Kinsler

Re: Zip Tie Trick?

Thank You Mark .

And , sorry for jacking this thread .

I still think we can find much better uses for zip ties . ;)

Re: Zip Tie Trick?

This was sent to me: https://streamable.com/rrox5g

The trick being to end at the valve stem and keep the beads in the "valley" of the rim as you work around (see at 1:22 he presses the tire back in to the "valley" of the rim) since the diameter is smaller. (edited)

Re: Zip Tie Trick?

Emil Kniemel /

> Dan Pasanen Wrote:

> -------------------------------------------------------

> This was sent to me: https://streamable.com/rrox5g

>

> The trick being to end at the valve stem and keep the beads in the

> "valley" of the rim as you work around (see at 1:22 he presses the tire

> back in to the "valley" of the rim) since the diameter is smaller.

I think I always start with the valve stem side for no reason other than its what i did. ill try it next time.

Re: Zip Tie Trick?

Tight fit, use lube. Everybody knows that (!)

Re: Zip Tie Trick?

Finishing at the valve is usually a pain in the ass, because you have less flex on the tire and tube with the valve stuck in the hole.

I also leave the valve loose, only a couple turns on the nut, because a lot of tires like to pinch the thick rubber under the bead, and the tire won't seat. If it's loose, you can push it in under the bead.

Re: Zip Tie Trick?

Dirty30 Dillon /

> baird co Wrote:

> -------------------------------------------------------

> Finishing at the valve is usually a pain in the ass, because you have

> less flex on the tire and tube with the valve stuck in the hole.

>

> I also leave the valve loose, only a couple turns on the nut, because a

> lot of tires like to pinch the thick rubber under the bead, and the tire

> won't seat. If it's loose, you can push it in under the bead.

This, my hands aren't big, but I'm not fishing around trying to finagle the stem into the rim hole.

Re: Zip Tie Trick?

Well hells bells. I've been using baby powder on the tube and inside the new tire and on the bead for ultimate slippage, a tire spoon and then both feet to hold the tire on as I advance around the rim. It's a rather simian method, but I used to have to play piano with my right shoe off to be able to use "The Simian Grip" on my sustain pedal to keep it from walking away, and no amount of that rubber rug anti-skid stuff seemed to help. Lowell George was right - Feats Don't Fail Me Now.

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